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TillyCurrer

Hardcore Heroines

Teenage book review, reviewing since September 2012. I love reviewing books and reading, I blog at Hardcore Heroines about strong, badass females and hot werewolves and vampires. Kate Daniels and Curran are my kind of people.
Pure - Jennifer L. Armentrout Wow. Love this series now! Review to come soon, suffice to say, I've started the 3rd one straight after!!
Acid - Emma Pass I really enjoyed this Dystopia world, I thought it was interesting and engaging. Jenna is the protagonist and I really enjoyed the amount of times she changes identities and goes undercover, because it’s not something I read often in YA. Surgeons entirely change her face’s appearance at least twice, which seemed offhanded and casual; and even though it’s possible to do so in the present day, I’ll admit that it threw me a bit. Jenna is your typical Dystopia heroine–strong, and fought for her beliefs to stay alive. She didn’t really have any choice. In the second half is where I found Jenna to be the most brave and courageous, I can’t say anything without spoiling it, but it was a really interesting plot twist that changed my out-look on the story.
The plot and overall conflict of Acid was intriguing, but I think at times the characters were lacking a little bit in the depth department, simply because everything was fast paced and happening so quickly. It never really slowed down enough to focus on minor details or the complexity of Jenna or anyone else’s character. However, it was a gripping novel, full of twists and turns, with scene changes and also slow, tense parts that kept me reading.
There is a little bit of romance, but not huge amounts, but enough to satisfy me, because I like my under-lying romance. If there were any more, it would seem forced, as there aren’t many opportunities in Acid for there to be many romantic scenes.
Acid is very fast-paced, there’s always something happening and Jenna is always on the move or undercover. The Dystopia world was fairly extensive, and had very interesting elements to it. Once reached the age of 16, teenagers are required to be partnered with a random person of the opposite sex to live with the rest of their lives and they’re called ‘Life Partners’. Eventually, the couple get a notification to say that they are ready to have a baby, and that’s that. People don’t think anything of it, it’s simply the norm. Note: opposite sex, no same-sex relations at all, and it always makes me sad to see society go back a couple of steps from where we are now. I find that in a lot of Dystopia books, life is restricted like this and the new government controls them. Every aspect of people’s lives were monitored and listened to, with England having been completely cut off from any other countries and all citizens ignorant on what life is like outside of our small country.
It was extremely refreshing to read a book set in the UK, and I was so glad to read another UKYA book! Lucy at Queen of Contemporary is always insisting we read more UKYA books, and I know I don’t read enough. I’m trying to support books written by UK authors, as well as books that aren’t American, because I read a lot of books written by American authors.
I seriously recommend Acid, if you’re on a Dystopia trip right now. It is a standalone novel, so no pesky wait for another book; it’s gripping and you don’t have to invest loads into it, because you know it’s going to wrap-up nicely.
Rating: 4 Stars
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Shadows - Paula Weston I was not expecting to enjoy Shadows as much as I did because I’ve had a bad experience with Angel novels lately, however it was very enjoyable.
Shadows was so easy to read, not only was the book nice and floppy–I like floppy books!–but I would get immersed in this world and later realise that I’d read 150 pages or so, which is a lot for a slow reader like me.
I love books where you’re thrown into a story because there’s a lot about the characters past that you don’t know. It also means that the world-building can go terribly wrong, because the narrator is not new to the story, yet it needs to be explained to the reader. However, Weston cleverly avoided this by having the best of both worlds and giving Gaby a memory problem, meaning she’s learning the world with us, but technically, she’s not new. This hopefully means that Weston can give us some prequel novellas and some insight into the story before Shadows, because she very carefully gave us enough information to keep me begging to know more about Gaby’s past. I desperately want to know the past between her, Daniel and Rafa; and also Gaby and her brother Jude.
Gaby was an interesting character, because she had no idea who she was, exactly. She had little memory of her former life, and she was grieving for her twin brother. Although Gaby is 18, and this could technically be described as a YA novel, I really think it’s more of a Paranormal Romance, simply in the way it’s been written. Gaby was fairly helpless in this book, because fair enough, she’s forgotten all of her fighting skills. She’s not very savvy about this new world or how to fight. I really want to see her training with Rafa in the next instalment because I don’t like my heroines completely useless! Rafa reminds me of Daemon from Jennifer L. Armentrout’s Lux series, arrogant and not entirely explained yet. I can’t wait to see more of his character!
The pace of Shadows starts off fairly slow, and gains speed about 100 pages in, but I feel this series has yet to reach it’s full potential. I think Weston has a lot more in store for the next book. I hope that as the series goes on, more plot twists are revealed, as there were quite a few in Shadows that kept me entertained.
I don’t think the world-building was that extensive, possibly not to overload us, but I’d really like to know more about the world.
Overall, I really enjoyed Shadows and I flew through it!
Rating: 4 Stars
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Clockwork Angel - Cassandra Clare Cassandra Clare is extremely popular for her other series, The Mortal Instruments, especially with the film coming out in 4 DAYS GUYS. Anyway, The Infernal Devices is set in the same world, but a couple of centuries before, and instead of New York, it’s set in London.

Clockwork Angel was highly enjoyable, the world was extensive, the characters were funny and complex. I’m absolutely delighted I have another two books to also read. Although these books are huge and I’m a slow reader, I manage to fly through all of Cassandra Clare’s novels, and this was no exception.

Tessa begins not knowing a thing about the Shadowhunter world, and so things are discovered new from her perspective. Which was interesting for me, because I’d already experienced it in the modern world with Clary. For those of you who haven’t read The Mortal Instruments (and you really should) you can definitely pick this one up and not get confused. There are certain references that will not be understood, but they will likely go right over your head and you won’t notice them.

“Sometimes, when I have to do something I don't want to do, I pretend I'm a character from a book. It's easier to know what they would do.”

Oh how I hate love triangles, and Clare seems very fond of them, which proves inconvenient. Here we have the choice of either Jem or Will. Jem is the safe, intelligent, kind-hearted and genuinely nice person. Will is witty, mean and a bad-boy. It’s not hard to imagine who the most popular is (Will), everyone loves a bad-boy.

Seeing the Shadowhunter world in a different time was fascinating, and immortal characters like Magnus and Camille were also in Clockwork Angel, as well as City of Bones. I adore Magnus, and although Camille is a not a villain, nor a ally in The Mortal Instruments, I loved her character in this series. Magnus and her have a complexity and past that is so slowly revealed, I'm left desperate for more.

The plot is gripping, and something completely unexpected to me, because we’ve not seen these kind of ‘creature things’ before and I loved the fresh take. It was like the Shadowhunter world equivalent of zombies/robots. I’m so excited to read the next instalment when I have time.

I really enjoy Clare’s sarcastic, witty humour, and the Shadowhunter world, overall I give this a 4 star rating, and I expect it’s going to get eeeven better.

Lash

Lash - L.G. Castillo Lash has a feel of New Adult/ Paranormal and was such a lovely read. It had the premise of Guardian Angels, and forbidden love. Who doesn’t enjoy the trope of forbidden love?
I had not read any New Adult before this–but I kept telling myself to–but because I like Romance and Paranormal, this was really a fantastic combination. It didn’t take me very long to finish and was a light read–which considering that I’ve been in a reading funk for a couple of weeks now was a warm welcome.
Lash was a bit of fun, and humour is present throughout the novel, which blended into what was mostly a rather serious storyline. It’s always good when an author can add humour without completely altering the tone, because I don’t enjoy 100% serious books, I need humour!
The only thing that really let this novel down was that I never fell in love with the characters, and I don’t even know why. Well okay, I did fall for Lash a little bit–but who wouldn’t? There was great internal and external conflict, Castillo has clearly tried to give layers to the characters and Lash had an intriguing mystery past. But still, they weren’t the kind of characters that made you snort with laughter and want to eat ice cream with them in the wee hours of the morning.
Even though I didn’t fall in love with Naomi’s character, I still liked her. Anyone who has dealt with loss and grieving can relate to Naomi’s character. She lost her mother to cancer, then other events happen that add to the loss. I felt like some things were unexpected and unrealistic, though. I don’t want to give out spoilers, but she gets a little depressed at one point, and what happened next seemed like it was just written in to make the story more interesting/easier for the storyline. Not actually because it fit with Naomi’s character.
Either way, Lash was an enjoyable read, and although it wasn’t jaw-dropping or heart-stopping, Lash and Naomi were fun characters, and the Guardian Angels storyline was really intriguing. This novel was at times cheesy and I felt melodramatic, but still a great read.
Rating: 3 Stars
The Assassin and the Princess - Sarah J. Maas Paperback: 432 pages
Publisher: Bloomsbury Childrens (2 Aug 2012)
ISBN-10: 140883233X
Source: Bloomsbury–thank you! This has in no way affected my honest review!

This entire world is entrancing and amazing. I was gripped all the way through, which doesn’t usually happen, I get slightly bored at some places. Not with Throne of Glass, plot threads linked seamlessly together and complex characters kept me entertained.
I got so invested in all the characters, not just Celeana. Although Celeana was badass and completely my type of heroine. She’s independent, witty, and has a vulnerable side to her past. She’s the type of character who pulled me in instantly and I rooted for all the way through. She was actually really funny, not what I was expecting from a master assassin. Which is fantastic, I like characters who don’t take themselves too seriously and make me laugh.
Chaol is so mysterious, we are kept in the dark a lot about him, so of course that makes me desperate to know more about his character, and I hope he’s explored more in book 2. He’s the kind of character who doesn’t access his feeling easily and I was kind of frustrated with him!
Prince Dorian reads. I don’t know how many times I have to say how much I love a guy that reads. He’s also an expert swordsman, but he prefers to hunker down with a thoughtful book. He constantly had witty back and forth with Celeana which proved entertaining. I found him so charming!
I adore the character development, how Celeana learns to trust, and actually have friends. She sets in wanting to win this competition, but she’s very loyal, despite how determined she is. Chaol also becomes a little more open, though not as much as I’d hoped! Also, Prince Dorian stops being so fickle!
This love triangle is excruciating, because I don’t have a favourite. I thought I did, at parts I’d be sure it was one person and then I realised I love the other as well. This hardly ever happens, I always have a definite favourite! It’s completely thrown me off!
There were a couple of antagonists to keep things interesting, I get bored with the entire focus being on destroying one bad guy. Some of them are undoubtedly going to cause trouble in the next book.
The world itself is captivating, it’s set in a castle, in a historical time period, which I always enjoy. I honestly loved this book sooo much, and completely recommend it to anyone who enjoys strong heroines (who doesn’t?) and amazing worlds!
I am now mourning this world, and desperate to read the next one!
Rating: 5 Stars!
This Northern Sky - Julia Green I was expecting a sweet YA chick lit when I picked this up, and I think the synopsis is very misleading. It says ‘And there she meets the islanders, who are prepared to accept her and listen to her. And possibly fall in love with her.’ Emphasis on the word Possibly, because actually, it’s quite clear 1/3 of the way through, that’s never going to happen. They love her, but nobody falls in love with her, which I was disappointed with. However, this is a YA novel, and the focus wasn’t particularly on Kate’s love life, than making new friends and parents that are growing apart. It was also very nice to read some UKYA!
Other than that, This Northern Sky by Julia Green was rather enjoyable, and quite a small, easy read. It didn’t take me long to finish, but this isn’t an action book or anything, it’s a quick contemporary.
A lot of teenagers could relate to this book because Kate faces her parents rocky relationship, and turns to the solitude of the island to keep her centred. There were many questions asked wondering if Kate was to blame herself or if things were different, could her parents still love each other? I really liked the idea of leaving everything behind and finding new friends, and there was a quote in it that was my favourite, and very true:
‘You have to think about why people move over here,’ Isla says. ‘Quite often they’re running away from something. People who aren’t so good at getting on with others, they don’t understand how a real community works.’ She laughs. ‘They forget that they bring themselves with them, where ever they run.’
This was not the deepest or grittiest of books, for me. However it’s a great book for teenagers with divorced/divorcing parents to relate to, and quite a touching novel in that respect.
The ending was nice, and left me satisfied, but it didn’t leave me with a huge imprint. Overall, I’m going to give it 3 Stars.
All Our Yesterdays - Cristin Terrill Actual rating: 4.5 stars

After I read this my head was left spinning—as anyone who follows me on Twitter will know. I tweeted about this…a lot. All Our Yesterdays is a time-travel Dystopia, and I wasn’t exactly sure what to expect, but it did not disappoint.
There are mainly two points of view, Em and Marina. Marina is Em’s past self. Em goes back in time to stop the making of Cassandra (the time machine) to a time where Marina is inhabiting. I loved the way they were very different, yet ultimately still the same person. Marina is far more superficial and trying to fit in with her friends, having a teenage love for James. She doesn’t get enough attention from her parents and is trying to be a ‘normal’ teenager.
Em is far more grounded, she has figured out how to love herself, but she’s haunted. She’s been through so much after the making of Cassandra. She’s been tortured and left in a cell. Em doesn’t want Marina to have to go through what she has gone through, and sets out with her partner to stop the making of Cassandra. Em’s love interest is hilarious, he’s the perfect blend of cockiness and sexiness. Such a great addition to my fictional boyfriends! Which there are shamefully many of.
We also got flashbacks from the time when Em was running away from the corruption, and the awful memories of what happened to those she loved. These flashbacks filled in the blanks and made the story a lot more interesting.
I went in All Our Yesterdays without knowing anything at all, I didn’t even read the blurb! Instead of confusing me, it actually made everything more interesting. The plot twists are shocking, delightful, and at times cry-worthy. Seriously, read page 364 and get back to me, because that was the most awful thing in the entire book.
I wanted to see more of the Dystopian world, when most of the book is set in today’s world. It was enforced many times throughout the novel how corrupted the world had become with the making of Cassandra, yet we didn’t see it as much I would have liked. I’m hoping this is going to be in the next instalment.
I definitely recommend this book to Dystopia lovers, or even people starting out with Dystopia! I’m left empty without the next book, which is not out until 2014!
Rating; 4.5 stars
Dare You To - Katie McGarry Print Length: 470 pages
Page Numbers Source ISBN: 0373210639
Publisher: MIRA Ink (22 May 2013)
Source: Netgalley (This has in NO way affected my honest review)
Goodreads
Dare You To was such an enjoyable read! It had it all: internal conflict and external conflict, with really well done character development considering it’s only over one book. It’s written in both Ryan’s and Beth’s POV, which made it easier to empathise with Ryan and see the story from a bigger perspective.

Beth has issues. Not that that’s surprising considering her home situation. She has trouble with trust, abandonment, love, relationships in general, and the list goes on. Ryan’s life looks perfect to Beth, but as she looks closer she can see the cracks.

There are so many plot lines going on that keeps this book well-paced, yet not too taxing to read. It’s a fantastic, well written story with brilliantly complex and tortured characters. Beth was on the precipice of annoying me because of her trust issues, but if she’d trusted Ryan any quicker, it would be unrealistic. It’s not a light-hearted, fluffy book, it gets really quite gritty considering it’s a YA romance and contemporary.

Dare You To has got the malicious ex-girlfriend, muscley jocks, humour, and every kind of relationship strains. So many messed up relationships: Beth and her Uncle, Beth and her mother, Beth and her best friend, Beth and Ryan. Ryan and his brother, Ryan and his mother and father. All of these relationships were tested and brought to the fore-front at least once in Dare You To, really exploring their dynamics. I probably liked it so much because of of the complex characters and relationships—which I’m a sucker for.

I didn’t particularly like Beth or relate to her much, but I appreciated her character. That rarely happens to me, if I can’t relate to the character, I’ll probably stop reading. If can’t find an emotional connection, I simply won’t bother. I empathised for Beth, and enjoyed her character, but I’m not sure I would want to be her best friend or anything. She was very tough and goth-girl, she had to put on this persona because of her terrible upbringing. I liked Ryan a lot more, because he was more simple, yet still had deep problems. I could relate to him more for some reason.

I could go on more about this book because there is so much that goes on and so much to discuss, but I won’t!

Rating: B+ I would like to give this an A, but I don’t feel like it’s affected me enough, or been one of the best books I’ve ever read. Otherwise, hiiighly enjoyable and tense read. With shockingly true events and oh-so complex characters. Can’t wait to read the next in the series!

Angelfall (Penryn & the End of Days, #1)

Angelfall (Penryn & the End of Days, #1) - Susan Ee I’m not keen on Angels novels, I don’t know why but every Angel book I’ve read leaves something to be desired–I’m looking at you Hush Hush and Fallen. The premise to Angelfall was unusual, because Angels caused the post-apocalyptic world and are evil. I got a little freaked out by how awful Angels were in this book!
It is quite uncommon that I love the heroine and get a little annoyed with the love-interest. However, I found Raffe was luke-warm and then cold towards Penryn. Presumably so he didn’t develop feelings for her and to ‘protect’ her, but honestly, it became annoying. However, I loved Penryn’s independence because she’d learnt martial arts and could protect herself, despite being a little lost.
There are many cliché’s that pulled this novel down for me in rating, most of them involving Raffe. Angelfall isn’t entirely to blame however, it’s also the other Young Adult books churning out the same clichéd stories that are wearing me down.
An example of a cliché was that Raffe was described as ‘Adonis like’ and Penryn was ‘boring looking’. I find this is the case with a lot of Young Adult novels, with the stunningly attractive male falling in love with the average-looking female. I like reading about confident girls, and I don’t need the guys to be God-like in appearance to keep me interested.
Me: “What? This guy doesn’t look like a Greek God?” *shuts book* “Nope, not good enough.”
Raffe was sometimes unreasonably rude to Penryn and I felt like she was too kind towards him and it would’ve made things more interesting if she’d defended herself more.
I empathised with Raffe and his situation, considering a part of him had literally been ripped away from him. I did like Raffe, and in some scenes of the book, my heart melted a little. However, he brings up quite a few of my annoyances and pet-peeves, that I could not ignore.
Penryn was on a mission; her wheelchair-bound sister had gotten kidnapped and Penryn has to save her from evil Angels who’d taken over the world. Oh, and she’s also got a crazy mother who likes talking to demons and showing up at the most inappropriate times. Penryn was fantastic, I really understood her–she was a normal teenager who didn’t entirely know what she was doing, but wasn’t completely helpless. She had a mission and no one was going to stop her, I admired her determination.
Towards the end climax, I was completely shocked and the plot really thickens from there till the end. It was a very open ending, because I have no idea what’s going to happen in the next installment, but it stopped on a satisfying, positive note. I’m interested to see where this story-line goes, especially for Penryn’s sake.
I didn’t love, love Angelfall, but I really enjoyed it and would definitely recommend it.
This book gave me tons to think about, there were a lot of things that did not cater to my personal preferences, yet I still managed to enjoy it, which says something!
I’m wavering, but I’m going to go with 3.5 Stars. Recommended if you like Angels, and hot n’ cold relationships.
If anyone has a recommendation for a good Angel book, let me know. I’ve tried Hush Hush by Becca Fitzpatrick and Fallen by Lauren Kate. I didn’t like them.
Delirium - Lauren Oliver “Symptoms of Amor Deliria Nervosa
PHASE ONE:
-preoccupation; difficulty focusing
-dry mouth
-perspiration, sweaty palms
-fits of dizziness and disorientation
-reduced mental awareness; racing thoughts; impaired reasoning skills”
Lena lives in a world where love is forbidden and considered a disease. No one is allowed to love anyone or anything–not even their children–and at the age of 18 everyone has a brain surgery that gets rid of their ability to love. Lena is counting down the days until she has the procedure, to make her like everyone else. After she has the surgery, she will be paired with someone who is scientifically compatible with her, and they will have as many children as they’re financially able.
Her mother was illegally uncured, and so different from everyone else. Having the procedure is a huge step in proving Lena’s nothing like her mother and that she’s normal. Lena’s mum didn’t do ordinary ‘mum stuff’, she used to play with Lena and her sister, kiss their bruises when they tripped over. And then she killed herself, after the third time the government tried to cure her unsuccessfully. Now Lena is living with her aunt who has tried her best to steer her away from the taint on their family caused by her mother. Except, after spending so long counting down the days until the procedure, Lena is beginning to have doubts. She doesn’t know who she can trust, and can’t decide if what she has been believing all her life is a lie.
“PHASE TWO:
-periods of euphoria; hysterical laughter and heightened energy
-periods of despair; lethargy
-changes in appetite; rapid weight loss or weight gain
-fixation; loss of other interests
-compromised reasoning skills; distortion of reality
-disruption of sleep patterns; insomnia or constant fatigue
-obsessive thoughts and actions
-paranoia; insecurity”
This book is so good, and it really fed my love for Dystopia at the moment. Lena was confused about love–something that was always a rather simple concept in today’s society. Instead of being celebrated, love is feared, and eradicated. Lena notices that everyone who gets cured is not the same afterwards, doesn’t act the same and are rather unseeing and bland. But she doesn’t want to turn out like her mother, she wants to be normal.
I’m a little curious as to how they are doing brain surgery and practically changing people’s personality, or putting a damper on it. I’m not sure if this is going to be addressed in the next book or not, but I’m quite curious, considering the brain is quite fragile and you can’t just take random bits out.
“PHASE THREE (CRITICAL):
-difficulty breathing
-pain in the chest, throat or stomach
-complete breakdown of rational faculties; erratic behavior; violent thoughts and fantasies; hallucinations and delusions
PHASE FOUR (FATAL):
-emotional or physical paralysis (partial or total)
-death”
I really enjoyed Delirium, and I’m disappointed that they are cancelled the TV series they were going to do, as I’d really like to see this and how they would portray the world. Lena was trying to be strong and support her beliefs, except she didn’t really know what they were. Even though Lena had grown up in this world, it was enjoyable discovering the cracks that she’d never considered were there, right along with her. The concept was fascinating, but where a lot of Dystopia’s are primarily about government issues, this was about governmental issues on love. In other words, love takes up a lot of this storyline, and I’m not quite sure how I feel about it. I usually like the romance to take a back-burn or be slow-building—at least in the beginning–but this definitely wasn’t. Be warned, the love in this edged on insta-love, except it was written really well, so well, that I can’t call it insta-love, but it was close.
Just as I thought Lauren Oliver was going to end the series with a lull, there was a massive cliff-hanger ending. I’m ordering the second book tomorrow! Overall, I was captivated by the world and can’t wait to read the next one.
Rating: 4.5 Stars
Dead Ever After - Charlaine Harris A lot of people did not enjoy the conclusion to the Sookie Stackhouse series, some people hated who Sookie ended up with or the book altogether. I thought Harris did a good job at concluding a lot of loose ends with the minor and important characters, as most of the characters were given a cameo in the book. However, all of the cameo’s seemed quite forced and random, I think Charlaine could have done that with more finesse. Considering how many characters there are in this series, not every character was highlighted, but she didn’t miss out anyone important to me.

Now let’s get down to what everyone has been kicking up a fuss about. Who Sookie ends up with. For those of you who don’t know, Sookie Stackhouse is known for her many love interests, but has kept Eric for some time. I’m not going to spoil it, but I was extremely happy with who she ended up with-- just not how Charlaine Harris executed it. I don’t know why she took so long to write Sookie’s romantic happy ending, and it almost felt like a frantic pick of a random character, and that she didn’t even know until this book, who it would be. I would rather have had a slower build-up of the relationship over time in a couple of books, than what felt like a rushed ending in one.

I did enjoy it though, but it wasn’t the best in the series, and even though there was a happy ending, I felt it was quite melancholic for some reason. After all that Sookie went through in the series, I wanted a proper walk-into-the-sunset ending, which wasn’t there for me.

The plot was interesting, it got to a point where I didn’t want to put it down because I was intrigued, however not because I was gripped. I’m fully invested in the characters after reading about them for so many books, and that’s what makes this series so enjoyable. Nevertheless, once again the plot revolves around Sookie. It’s all about people wanting to wrong her and destroy her--as it always is--which I find rather tiresome.

I enjoyed it a lot more than other people seemed to, but the ending felt rushed and I wasn’t so keen on the plotline. Once again, the characters are what kept me entertained.
Forsaken by the Others - Jess Haines After the events of the previous novels, Shiarra Waynest finds herself facing the consequences of her skewed judgement. We are taken away from all the key characters, and Shiarra and her best friend Sara go together to another city. Forsaken by the Others was an enjoyable read, however it lacked in some key aspects that let it down.
I would have liked to see more Royce in this book, after the beginning he’s not really in it at all. I never like it when the author mixes things up and takes them to another setting, because it means we never get to see our favourite minor characters. The only good thing was we had the additional characters–The White Hats, who I really liked–probably because I like werewolves.
This book never got going for me, I was never in suspense about the plot, and nothing exciting or shocking happened enough. I enjoyed the idea of it, however the way it was executed didn’t keep me as intrigued as I’d have liked.
Shia was an interesting character, but it was never quite cleared up what was going on with her and if she was turning into a supernatural being. Her relationship with Royce wasn’t developed well enough either, or explored at all after the first few chapters. I thought she was refreshingly realistic, she didn’t pretend to be something she wasn’t and fight Vampires, or get herself in too deep in situations she knew she couldn’t handle. She’s a private investigator, not a fighter. The thing is, that’s usually where things are made interesting–when the heroine mucks up. Her voice was down-right hilarious at times and very dry, the way she was written was incredibly entertaining.
The world was the most intriguing aspect, it had vampires, werewolves, zombies and a hint of something else as well. I liked the characters, the setting, the supernatural elements, however I am not keen on how I kept waiting for the plot to thicken, but it never did. The pacing was too slow for me. I really loved the writing, and the voice of Shia, it was sarcastic and witty, and made observations that were so funny to read.
It sounds like I didn’t enjoy it from this review, but I did, it was simply the lack of suspense and slow pace that ruined it!
Rating: C+ Fantastic world and funny voice, but the plot left something to be desired.
The 5th Wave - Rick Yancey I don’t even know where to start on this review. The 5th Wave is an absolute gem and if you haven’t picked it up yet, I seriously suggest you go and do so right now.

The Earth sees an alien mothership and we try to contact them, but they don’t answer. Then, after ten days of silence, the first wave begins. The Others send out an electromagnetic pulse which takes out all forms of electricity, power, and kills half a million people. The second wave is a tsunami that kills everyone within sixty miles of a coastline, which is three billion people. The third wave is in the form of a plague which had a 97% mortality rate and took out more than 3.5 billion people.

‘Sometimes I think I might be the last human on earth’

Seventeen-year-old Cassie—for Cassiopeia--is alone in the world, camping in the woods while she tries to stay alive and away from the Others. She has a backpack of essentials including a teddybear, a tent and her gun.

‘The first rule of surviving the 4th Wave is don’t trust anyone’

Cassie is such a kick-ass character, she knows that she has to stay alone to survive and she does. Until she meets Evan Walker. It’s the only person she’s talked to in months and she can’t help but enjoy the human contact. Cassie is brave and fights for her right to stay on Earth which I loved. She was so strong and she’s only sixteen. She does what she has to do to survive and she keeps her promises, it was a delight to read from her perspective, despite the fact that she is written by a man.

Cassie’s not the only POV though, we also have a few others, who I will not name for fear of spoiling you all. I actually enjoyed their POV just as much as Cassie’s, and loved that all of their storylines were relevant and interlocked at various points in the book.

Young Adult Dystopian is a genre that’s increasingly growing, especially after the release of The Hunger Games. I even hesitate to say it’s the ‘Next Big Thing’ in terms of Young Adult and ‘mainstream’ books. It’s not surprising then, that this book is all over the blogosphere with people exclaiming how much they enjoyed it. I enjoyed it too. I’m starting to read more Dystopian’s and The Fifth Wave was something that was incredibly satisfying and different to read. The premise was different, the characters I felt were realistic. They all had their lives before the invasion and Yancey wrote flash-backs which made them more relatable.

I found the plot twists to be captivating, I thought I knew what was going on and then Yancey would flip the story upside-down and change my perspective. He was really good at making me doubt myself and sometimes even deliberately confused for me to make me think certain things about the situations and the characters.

Overall, a really enjoyable Dystopian read. If you’re looking for something to read in the Dystopian genre, I suggest you take a look, because I thought it was fantastic. Then I realised the second one comes out in Summer! Next year.
Friday Brown - Vikki Wakefield I’ve heard so many amazing reviews about Friday Brown from Jack at The Book Stop and Ruby at Feed Me Books Now, but I started reading it tentatively, because I didn’t want to get my hopes up. That wasn’t a problem because I really enjoyed it. A big thanks to Stephanie Speight at Text Publishing for sending a copy from…Australia!! That’s crazy, thanks again. This in no way affected my honest review.
I am a stickler for interesting characters, and there were plenty in Friday Brown. Friday was vulnerable and compassionate, but a little lost after her mother died. She was used to being on the move, never staying in one place and having the luxury of many fresh starts. After her mother died though, she had to stay with her Granddad, something that felt isolating, so she leaves and joins a group of runaway teenagers.
Friday’s relationship with Armen was ever-changing and reflected on both characters personalities and pasts. Armen was so captivating, she had an energy that made people want to be her, and Friday instantly feels drawn to her.
Everyone in this book had a story and an intriguing past, which made the characters deeper. Not all past’s were revealed, some left mysterious and that left things for the readers imagination. I liked the subtlety, it wasn’t shoved in my face, and sometimes that’s better than being told everything, because it keeps the reader guessing. I finished it on Wednesday, and I’m still thinking about the events and the characters.
Silence was a heartbreaking and amazing character, he feared being forgotten if he died, of never leaving an imprint on the world. He felt so inconsequential, especially when no one in his life has ever given him the right attention. He was just a runaway kid.
I enjoyed this book for the writing style and the characters, not so much the storyline. It’s very slow going until the climax—which is shocking and upsetting. It was like freezing water slapping me around the face. It really hit me. In addition, the prose was beautiful, sometimes I just got lost in the words. A lot of writing was on grief and death, which I could very much identify with.
Friday Brown took me out of my comfort zone and gave me deep, meaningful characters, with beautiful writing.
Rating: B+
White Cat - Holly Black Let’s all take a moment to appreciate the cover–I really like it!
This is such an intriguing premise to read about. I don’t read many book where the protagonist is male, so it was refreshing to read White Cat in a different perspective than I usually read Young Adult. Cassel is the black sheep in his family, he is not a Curse Worker. Unlike his two older brothers and his mother, who each have a power to change your emotions, you luck and your memories with simply a touch to the hand. Curse work is illegal, so many become crooks and con men, therefore Cassel has to become the best of the best con men to outsmart those more powerful than him.
Cassel goes to a boarding school and pretends he’s normal, he tries his hardest to blend in and be the average guy everyone wants him to be. Except he’s not really normal. Not only does he come from a family of workers, but he also once killed his best friends Lila—and he enjoyed it. But now he’s filled with self-loathing and he’s found sleep-walking, having dreams that he can’t explain. His brothers are keeping secrets too, so Cassel has to do his best to be conspicuous and out-smart his brothers to reveal the truth.
I really enjoyed White Cat and the premise it was built on. It took me a while to get fully invested because I thought the beginning was quite slow, but once it got going it was a great read. I loved the concept of the conmen and how Cassel tries to excel at lying and playing people, but sometimes messes up.
Cassel is a weird mix of being really flat and at the same time complex. He seemed interesting at the times when he was talking about himself and how he felt about killing Lila and being so out of place in his family. However, the writing style of Holly Black made him seem quite flat at times, and it was a rather weird mix.
I think it got slightly boring at times, but it’s quite a small book and it didn’t take me a lot to keep going, I was interested in seeing the resolution. I really did enjoy it, I just don’t think the characters were interesting enough for me. I wasn’t compelled to read it for the characters, but more the story. I will definitely keep reading this series, as it was a fun read, with intriguing plot-twists and fun con-men elements.
Rating 3.5 Stars